window

win·dow (wĭn’dō)
n.
1. a) An opening constructed in a wall, door, or roof that functions to admit light or air to an enclosure and is often framed and spanned with glass mounted to permit opening and closing. b) A framework enclosing a pane of glass for such an opening; a sash. c) A pane of glass or similar material enclosed in such a framework: »

The ball broke the window.

2. a) An opening or transparent part that resembles a window in function or appearance: »

a sail window.

b) The transparent panel on a window envelope.
3. The area or space immediately behind a window, especially at the front of a shop: »

goods displayed in the window.

4. A means of access or observation: »

St. Petersburg was Peter the Great's window onto the Baltic.

5. An interval of time during which an activity can or must take place: »

a window of opportunity for a space mission; a window of vulnerability when the air force was subject to attack.

6. Strips of foil dropped from an aircraft to confuse enemy radar; chaff.
7. A range of electromagnetic frequencies that pass unobstructed through a planetary atmosphere.
8. Computers A rectangular area on a screen in which a document, database, or application can be viewed independently of the other such areas.
9. Aerospace a) A launch window. b) An area at the outer limits of the earth's atmosphere through which a spacecraft must pass in order to return safely.
[Middle English, from Old Norse vindauga : vindr, air, wind; see wē- + auga, eye; see okw-.]
Word History: The source of our word window is a vivid metaphor. Window comes to us from the Scandinavian invaders and settlers of England in the early Middle Ages. Although we have no record of the exact word they gave us, it was related to Old Norse vindauga, "window," a compound made up of vindr, "wind," and auga, "eye," reflecting the fact that at one time windows contained no glass. The metaphor "wind eye" is of a type beloved by Norse and Old English poets and is called a kenning; other examples include Old Norse gjālfr-marr, "sea-steed," for "ship" and Old English hron-rād, “whale-road," for "sea."

Word Histories. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Window — Win dow, n. [OE. windowe, windoge, Icel. vindauga window, properly, wind eye; akin to Dan. vindue. ????. See {Wind}, n., and {Eye}.] [1913 Webster] 1. An opening in the wall of a building for the admission of light and air, usually closed by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • window — window, casement, dormer, oriel can mean an opening in the wall of a building that is usually covered with glass and serves to admit light and air. Window is the ordinary general term for the entire structure, including both its framework and the …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • window — (n.) early 13c., lit. wind eye, from O.N. vindauga, from vindr wind (see WIND (Cf. wind) (n.1)) + auga eye. (see EYE (Cf. eye) (n.)). Replaced O.E. eagþyrl, lit. eye hole, and eagduru, lit …   Etymology dictionary

  • window — [win′dō] n. [ME windoge < ON vindauga, window, lit., wind eye < vindr, WIND2 + auga, an eye; akin to Ger auge, EYE] 1. a) an opening in a building, vehicle, or container, for letting in light or air or for looking through, usually having a… …   English World dictionary

  • Window — (von engl. window „Fenster“) oder Plural Windows ([ˈwɪndoʊz]) stehen für: Microsoft Windows, ein Betriebssystem der Firma Microsoft Fenster (Computer), ein Benutzerschnittstellenkonzept bei Computern X Window System, eine grafische… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • window — WÍNDOW s.n. Fereastră, geam; vitrină. [pr. uíndău] (din engl. window) Trimis de tavi, 14.05.2008. Sursa: MDN  WINDOW [UÍNDOU] s. n. fereastră, geam; vitrină. (< engl. window) Trimis de raduborza, 14.02.2008. Sursa: MDN …   Dicționar Român

  • window — ► NOUN 1) an opening in a wall or roof, fitted with glass in a frame to let in light or air and allow people to see out. 2) an opening through which customers are served in a bank, ticket office, etc. 3) a transparent panel in an envelope to show …   English terms dictionary

  • Window — Win dow, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Windowed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Windowing}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To furnish with windows. [1913 Webster] 2. To place at or in a window. [R.] [1913 Webster] Wouldst thou be windowed in great Rome and see Thy master thus… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • window n — window of opportunity …   English expressions

  • Window — This article is about the part of a building. For the Microsoft operating system, see Microsoft Windows. For other uses, see Window (disambiguation) and Windows (disambiguation). Pair of windows, Old Ship Church, Hingham, Massachusetts …   Wikipedia

  • window — windowless, adj. windowy, adj. /win doh/, n. 1. an opening in the wall of a building, the side of a vehicle, etc., for the admission of air or light, or both, commonly fitted with a frame in which are set movable sashes containing panes of glass …   Universalium

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